Guide to Growing Tomatoes: From Seed To Harvest

Posted by Hilary & Christopher Mueller on

he more familiar you become with your plants and what they need thrive, the more 
rewarding and productive your garden will be! Below we’ve shared the basics of 
growing amazing Tomatoes; however, much of the information can be applied to 
Peppers, Tomatillos and Eggplants, which are also Nightshade vegetables. 
.
Remember, we all learn a lot through making mistakes; so be sure to leave space for 
those too! Lessons learned in the garden expand our knowledge and skills for years to 
come. There is no substitute for first hand experience.  
How To Grow Tomatoes From Seed
Source: mariaflaya @ Getty Images
.
.
.

STARTING TOMATO PLANTS FROM SEED

Timing

Start tomatoes from seed indoors 6-8 weeks before your local last frost date. The timing 
really matters! If you start them too early, the plants will outgrow the available indoor 
light and space before it is warm enough to move them outdoors. With insufficient light, 
tomato stems will become weak and leggy. If you start them too late, you could miss the 
season, and your fruit may not ripen before Autumn’s first frost.  
 

Potting Mix

Start with the right growing medium. You can go with a regular or organic myco-active 
“pro-mix potting soilTo add a bit of oompf to the potting soil we generally add some 
well-rotted manure, kelp powder & worm castings. 
 

CONTAINERS 

Your choice of container depends on your preferred method. There are pros and cons 
for each type. 
 
Seed Tray with/without cells
  
A seed tray is fine, but you will need to pot up seedlings into a deeper container as they 
grow. Seed trays with individual cells allow for easier control of individual plants. But  
having to re-pot them as they grow may disturb roots and hinder growth. If you are 
growing LOTS of tomatoes though, this method saves space. Also, seed trays typically 
fit perfectly over heat mats.  
  
Plastic plant pots from previous years  
 
This is a great option! Sterilize containers before reusing and make sure they have 
holes at the bottom to allow water to drain.   
 
We start our tomato seeds in a bit of potting soil at the bottom of a makeshift pot, 
usually a milk carton scored from a local cafe. *Poke holes in bottom of the milk carton!* 
As the tomato seedlings grow, we pinch off the lower leaves and add more soil. We 
continue this process until the soil level is flush with the top of the pot. This allows for 
transplants to develop massive root systems & eliminates the need to repotYou can do 
this with milk bags too; just start them out with the sides rolled down and roll them up as 
the plants grow and as you add more soil. 
.
.
. 

RAISING TOMATO SEEDLINGS 

 
Tomato seedlings will need a fair bit of regular attention as they grow. The most 
important things to consider at this stage are light, heat, water and space.  
 

Light

If you don’t have a dedicated space with grow lights, you will need space near a natural 
light source. If your tomato plants are not getting adequate light, they will appear leggy, 
which means the stems will be long, thin, and reaching towards a light source. Leggy 
stems are weak. To mitigate legginess, rotate your trays every few days and consider 
having a gentle fan blowing to build up their plant muscles. 💪
 

Heat

Tomato plants appreciate a little help from heat mats. Tomato seeds can be painfully slow to germinate if they are too cold, but germination times can be sped up with a little heat from beneath!

Nightshades thrive at 20-30ᵒC! If your plants are not getting enough heat, growth will slow or stop altogether and the leaves may turn a purple shade. *It is important to not that plants that produce purple, blue or black tomatoes often have purple tones to their leaves. This is normal for them.
 

Watering

Tomato plants need even & regular wateringMany issues can stem from inconsistent 
watering - too much or too little. 
 
Signs of overwatering include: Damping-Off Disease (wilting with thin rotting stems), 
fungus or mould on the soil surface and yellowing leaves. Damping Off Disease can 
also be caused by overly humid conditions and unsterilized containers. 
 
Signs of underwatering include: Weak, wilting plants & shrunken soil. Allowing plants to 
wilt can severely stunt their growth! This seems like a no-brainer, but it can happen to 
the best of us and it is important to know how to best come out of it. Extremely dry soil 
doesn’t hold water, so surface watering doesn’t cut it. Super dry pots/trays must be 
soaked, not simply watered, to become re-hydrated. 
 

Space

The final frontier. Once they get going, tomato plants grow quickly, and may outgrow 
their space and/or containers before they are ready for the garden. Our milk carton 
method is a great way to avoid re-potting. If you do find yourself in a position where 
re-potting is unavoidable, remember that every little “hair” on the stem is a baby root. 
Place the root mass at the bottom of the new pot and bury the tomato plant up to the 
bottom of the newest leaves. *Peppers do not have these rootlets, so don’t bury them! 
 
 

PESTS 

If you are starting your tomatoes in a hoop house, you need to watch out for Cutworms, 
Slugs and Mice nibbling your tender plants! Indoor pests to watch for include Aphids 
and Spider Mites, which could find their way from your houseplants to your seedlings. 
There are some detailed hacks for dealing with Tomato pests in our article on Tomato Pests & Diseases.   
 
Source: John Gavloski, MAFRI 
 
 

HARDENING OFF  

Ideally, your first day of hardening-off should be overcast & not windy. Bring your plants 
outside to a sheltered, shady area for part of the first day, and a bit longer each day that 
follows. Slowly increasexposure to direct sun and the elements. After a week of this 
routine, your tomato plants are hardened off and if your local frost date has passed, its 
time to move them into the garden!  

  

HOW TO TRANSPLANT TOMATO SEEDLINGS

You’ll want to plant your tomato plants deeply in the garden. When transplanting aim to bury 1/3 to 1/2 of the stem along with the root ball. So, make sure you dig the hole deep enough. By doing this you will encourage a massive root system! For us, the root is the depth of a milk carton, so we dig our holes to one foot. Think of that root’s ability to expand and to collect water from deep in the Earth, all Summer long!

Leave a bowl-shaped depression around the base of the plant so that water flows down
towards its roots. If you decide to grow tomatoes in pots, choose a large, deep container
to help maintain soil moisture and prepare to water every day.

SUN, SOIL, SPACING AND SUPPORTS  

 

Sun & Soil

Tomato plants prefer full sun and rich, deeply watered soil. Plenty of compost, manure, 
and organic matter will keep your plants going strong. Planting white clover as a living 
mulch can also provide valuable nutrients, like nitrogen, and conserve moisture in the 
soil. 
 

Spacing

Give your plants enough space! Tomatoes, Peppers, Tomatillos and Eggplants should 
all get 18-24 inches of personal space (between plants). Closely spaced, crowded 
plants will deplete nutrients, and can create mildew issues. You want air to circulate 
freely around each plant to prevent disease and minimize pests. Pruning each plant to 
one main trunk can help with airflow and will put all of the plant’s energy into producing 
beautiful, juicy fruit! Biologically active soils, with cover cropping or regular inputs of 
compost / manure provide all the nutrients tomato plants need to thrive!  
 

Supports  

All tomatoes benefit from support. Determinate, or bush tomatoes, do not grow very tall 
and require only simple staking. Indeterminate varieties are sprawly and can reach 6-10  
feet in height. As they continue to grow, the more fruit they’ll produce. Indeterminate 
tomato plants need strong stakes & do best when suckers are actively pruned away. 
When considering supports, a good rule of thumb is to always allow for more height 
than you expect the plants to need. Also consider, strong, gusty winds that can arrive in 
late Summer. 
 
For more on how to care for your tomato plants in the garden, including info on common 
 

SAVING TOMATO SEEDS 

Saving seeds from your own garden opens up a whole new level of rewards. 
Gathering seeds from your own garden creates genetic resilience for your area’s unique 
micro-climate and a more intimate relationship with your plants.♥ 
.
Learn more about seed saving and what you need to consider in The Incredible Guide 
 
Saving Your Own Tomato Seeds

Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →